Skip to main content
Alumni homeNew York Tech News home
Story
9 of 20

Celebrating Research and Scholarship

Faculty and staff gathered at NYIT de Seversky Mansion to celebrate one another’s academic research and achievements at the annual Faculty Scholars recognition event. Apr 1, 2024

Pictured: Assistant Professor of School Counseling Cameka Hazel, Ed.D., tries on a virtual reality headset at the Faculty Scholars reception.

Faculty and staff convened at NYIT de Seversky Mansion on New York Tech’s Long Island campus on March 27 to mingle and celebrate one another’s academic research and achievements at the Faculty Scholars Luncheon, a festive occasion and an unparalleled opportunity to hear, see, and appreciate the breadth and depth of scholarship at New York Tech.

This event commends New York Tech’s full-time and adjunct faculty and staff for the scholarly and creative achievements completed during the preceding calendar year in any of the academic fields represented by the university’s schools or colleges. Qualifying achievements include, receiving a grant, publishing original research articles in a nationally recognized peer-reviewed journal or book, and obtaining a patent, among others.

“There are so many good reasons to be an active researcher,” New York Tech President Hank Foley, Ph.D., said as he kicked off the luncheon. “You have the opportunity to mentor students and change their lives by showing them and bringing to life another side of the disciplines that they are studying.”

Dozens of scholars exhibited their posters and papers during the event, with three faculty members delivering a formal presentation of their most recent work. Those selected faculty are Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Reza Khalaj Amineh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences Weikang Cai, Ph.D., and Assistant Professor of Biological and Chemical Sciences Jole Fiorito, Ph.D.

RezaAminehFacultyScholars2024

Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Reza Khalaj Amineh, Ph.D., presents his research, “Applications of Electromagnetic Waves in Sensing and Imaging.”

Amineh began the formal presentations with “Applications of Electromagnetic Waves in Sensing and Imaging,” a brief review of ongoing projects in the Applied Electromagnetics Lab located on the New York City campus. His work uses electromagnetic waves for imaging and sensing applications; the applications he highlighted include microwave imaging for nondestructive testing and biomedical diagnosis, hand gesture recognition that could significantly improve coordination and neurological processing in children with autism and those struggling with fine motor skills, water quality testing, and wireless soil sensing for smart agriculture.

WeikangCaiFacultyScholars2024

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences Weikang Cai, Ph.D., presents his research, “Astrocytes: The Rising Star in Fighting Neurological Diseases.”

Next up was Cai with “Astrocytes: The Rising Star in Fighting Neurological Diseases.” He described his lab’s study of human diseases that affect the brain. Backed by a two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), his research shows that astrocytes, traditionally overlooked and understudied brain cells, are playing crucial roles in diabetes, major depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and dopamine regulation. He presented his recent discoveries showing that astrocyte-initiated “broadcasting” systems can affect the development and progression of major depression and Alzheimer’s disease. These findings may have significant therapeutic potential to treat a variety of neurological diseases.

JoleFioritoFacultyScholars2024

Assistant Professor of Biological and Chemical Sciences Jole Fiorito, Ph.D., presents her research, “Development of Multi-Target Molecules for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Fiorito closed the presentations with “Development of Multi-Target Molecules for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease.” She presented her work on developing multi-target molecules for treating the disease. Supported by a three-year grant from the NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Fiorito’s research seeks to create a compound that inhibits two specific enzymes, thus helping improve learning and memory processes in Alzheimer’s patients. Her lab hopes to successfully develop a single-drug treatment to stop Alzheimer’s progression while reducing the side effects that taking multiple drugs can generate.

“I think you all change the world,” Provost and Executive Vice President Jerry Balentine, D.O., said in his address to faculty. “Not just by teaching students or by providing service to New York Tech, but by the research you do. I can guarantee you all of your research will impact our future world.”

Latest New York Tech News